Acrylamide Testing

Acrylamide testing in food

Acrylamide is a chemical substance formed in starchy food products during high temperature cooking (over 120°C) in the process of frying, roasting or baking. It is formed by a reaction between amino acids and sugars in a chemical process known as the Maillard Reaction. It is found in products such as roasted potatoes and root vegetables, fried potatoes, potato crisps, bread, toast, biscuits, cakes, coffee and some cereals. Acrylamide is not deliberately added to foods during growing or production, but is a natural by-product of the cooking process, and has always been present in our food.

Trials have shown that Acrylamide in the diet causes cancer in animals. Whilst evidence from human trials on the effects of acrylamide in the diet is not conclusive, it is believed that Acrylamide in food has the potential to cause cancer, and it is therefore important to monitor and reduce exposure.

In 2015 the European Food Safety Authority (FSA) adopted an opinion on Acrylamide in food. Based on animal studies, the FSA has confirmed previous evaluations that Acrylamide in food potentially increases the risk of developing cancer for consumers in all age groups.

On 20th November 2017 the EU Commission released Regulation EU 2017/2158 to establishing mitigation measures and benchmark levels for the reduction of the presence of Acrylamide in food. The regulation sets out various criteria along with benchmark levels for various food materials and will be applied from 11th April 2018.

If you would like more information on Acrylamide testing, or to discuss your specific requirements with one of our team, please contact any of our sites directly or complete the form on the left hand side.

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